The Verkhovna Rada (parliament) on Tuesday approved the second and final reading of a bill lifting parliamentary immunity from its deputies. The law may come into force on January 1.

A total of 373 deputies, 73 votes above the minimum required to pass constitutional laws, voted in favor of a bill to delete a paragraph of the 80-year period in which the members of parliament could not be brought to criminal responsibility or detained without the approval of the Rada Council.

However, the draft remains an item in the same article that exempts MPs from responsibility for the results of their vote and the content of their statements during the performance of their functions in the Council, except for responsibility for slander and insult.

Dmitry Razumkov, chairman of the Verkhovna Rada (parliament), which is dominated by deputies from the People's Servant Party loyal to President Vladimir Zelinsky, said the bill was fully in line with the constitution, but the "second-largest opposition bloc for life" said it would appeal. In the legality of the document before the Constitutional Court next week.

Razumkov had earlier backed the idea of ​​lifting immunity from the president as well, arguing that lifting immunity from deputies was insufficient, and should include the president and the judiciary, "so that everyone is equal before the law."

Source: Agencies

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The Verkhovna Rada (parliament) on Tuesday approved the second and final reading of a bill lifting parliamentary immunity from its deputies. The law may come into force on January 1.

A total of 373 deputies, 73 votes above the minimum required to pass constitutional laws, voted in favor of a bill to delete a paragraph of the 80-year period in which the members of parliament could not be brought to criminal responsibility or detained without the approval of the Rada Council.

However, the draft remains an item in the same article that exempts MPs from responsibility for the results of their vote and the content of their statements during the performance of their functions in the Council, except for responsibility for slander and insult.

Dmitry Razumkov, chairman of the Verkhovna Rada (parliament), which is dominated by deputies from the People's Servant Party loyal to President Vladimir Zelinsky, said the bill was fully in line with the constitution, but the "second-largest opposition bloc for life" said it would appeal. In the legality of the document before the Constitutional Court next week.

Razumkov had earlier backed the idea of ​​lifting immunity from the president as well, arguing that lifting immunity from deputies was insufficient, and should include the president and the judiciary, "so that everyone is equal before the law."

Source: Agencies

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