Talk With Mickael Blair

Published on 5 Oct 2017

and eventual
missions to Mars during the first meeting of the
National Space Council, held on October 5 at the
Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's
Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center, outside
Washington. Chaired by the Vice President, the
council meeting brought together
representatives from all aspects and sectors of
the national space enterprise, for the first time
in a quarter century. NASA's Acting
Administrator, Robert Lightfoot was among the


Published in Space

NASA announced that Three New Crew " Expedition 53 Flight Engineers Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba of NASA and Soyuz Commander Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos " Members Arrived at International Space Station

After a six-hour flight, NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei, Joe Acaba and Alexander Misurkin of Roscosmos arrived at the International Space Station at 10:55 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Sept. 12, where they will continue important scientific research.

The three crewmates launched aboard the Soyuz MS-06 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 5:17 p.m. (3:17 a.m. Baikonur time Wednesday), orbited Earth four times, and docked at the space station. The hatches between the spacecraft and station will open at 12:40 a.m. Wednesday.

The arrival of Vande Hei, Acaba and Misurkin restores the station's crew to six, as they join Expedition 53 Commander Randy Bresnik of NASA and Flight Engineers Sergey Ryazanskiy of Roscosmos and Paolo Nespoli of ESA (European Space Agency.) The new Expedition 53 crew members will spend more than four months conducting approximately 250 science investigations in fields such as biology, Earth science, human research, physical sciences and technology development.

Bresnik, Ryazanskiy and Nespoli are scheduled to remain aboard the station until December, and Vande Hei, Acaba and Misurkin are slated to return in February 2018.

This marks the first long-term increase in crew size on the U.S. segment from three to four, allowing NASA to maximize time dedicated to research. Highlights of upcoming investigations include demonstrating the benefits of manufacturing fiber optic filaments in a microgravity environment, a new study looking to slow or reverse muscle atrophy in astronauts during spaceflight, and exploring the ability of a synthetic bone material that adheres bone to metal within minutes to accelerate bone repair.

The crew members also are scheduled to receive Orbital ATK’s next commercial resupply mission in November, delivering several tons of research, supplies and vehicle hardware.

For more than 16 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the International Space Station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. A global endeavor, more than 200 people from 18 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 2,100 research investigations from researchers in more than 95 countries.

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Published in Space

 By /Christian Megan 

   With Artigau and McGill University astrophysicist Nicolas Cowan, both members of the Center for Research in Astrophysics of Quebec and the Institute for Research on Exoplanets, the international team of researchers include was led by the study’s principal author, Daniel Apai, associate professor of astronomy and planetary sciences at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

They released the mystery of the Dim objects called brown dwarfs, which is less massive than the Sun but more massive than Jupiter, have powerful winds and clouds – specifically, hot patchy clouds made of iron droplets and silicate dust. This team from the Scientists and  researchers including Université de Montréal astrophysicist Étienne Artigau have a new model for explaining how clouds move and change shape in brown dwarfs, using insights from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. Giant waves cause large-scale movement of particles in brown dwarfs’ atmospheres, change recently and they could to realize these giant clouds can move and thicken or thin surprisingly rapidly, in less than an Earth day, but did not understand why.

The study also suggests these clouds are organized in bands confined to different latitudes, traveling with different speeds in different bands.
Like Jupiter’s belts and zones

The distribution and motions of the clouds on brown dwarfs in this study are similar to those seen on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Neptune has cloud structures that follow banded paths, too, but its clouds are made of ice. Observations of Neptune from NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, operating in its K2 mission, were important in this comparison between the planet and brown dwarfs.

“The atmospheric winds of brown dwarfs seem to be more like Jupiter’s familiar regular pattern of belts and zones than the chaotic atmospheric boiling seen on the sun and many other stars,” said study co-author Mark Marley, of NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley.

Brown dwarfs can be thought of as failed stars because they are too small to fuse chemical elements in their cores. They can also be thought of as “super planets” because they are more massive than Jupiter, yet have roughly the same diameter. Like gas giant planets, brown dwarfs are mostly made of hydrogen and helium, but they are often found apart from any planetary systems. In a 2014 study using Spitzer, scientists found that brown dwarfs commonly have atmospheric storms.


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