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United Nations World Health Organization (WHO) reported today The total number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen has crossed one million.

urging greater efforts to tackle the outbreak and deal with the deteriorating health situation in the war-torn nation.

“The epidemic is not yet over and more concerted efforts need to be deployed to ensure that it is controlled in the immediate term and prevented from reoccurring in the near future,” WHO spokesperson Tarik Jašarevic told a press briefing in Geneva.

Responding to the deadly outbreak in late April, WHO set up treatment centres, provided supplies, trained health workers, and worked with local communities on ways to prevent the disease.

These efforts resulted in tens of thousands of lives being saved.

According to WHO, 99.7 per cent of the people who became sick with suspected cholera and who could access health services survived.

The UN agency continues to support dehydration treatment centres across the country as well as collect stool samples for lab testing, transport them to labs, meet operational costs and make available supplies and reagents.

It also continues surveillance, detection and treatment work.

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The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued a statement on the elimination of the hepatitis C virus by 2030, which can overcome this health problem and completely eradicate the virus that causes hepatitis and kills more than a million people every year worldwide. , And more than 300 million chronic hepatitis B and C.

At the conference, Egypt, Brazil, Australia and Georgia were highlighted for their innovative work to eliminate viral hepatitis.

Nine countries around the world are on track to eliminate hepatitis C by 2030;

countries are Egypt, Qatar, Australia, Brazil, Georgia, Germany, Iceland, Japan and the Netherlands.

According to new data from the Polaris Observatory, presented at the World Hepatitis Summit in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

 Egypt has pledged this year to implement comprehensive screening initiatives (including through military assistance) to cover 30 million people by the end of 2018, as well as to produce equivalent treatment drugs for less than $ 200 for the 12-week course.

"These new data show that the elimination of hepatitis C is possible, but it also shows that more efforts are needed to support governments in the treatment of viral hepatitis," said Charles Gore, president of the Global Alliance against Hepatitis. Hepatitis C offers governments the opportunity to learn from other countries and public health experts, in an effort to accelerate progress toward disease elimination.

Polaris Observatory is a public health research firm based in Lafayette, Colorado, United States of America, one of the main focus areas of epidemiology of Hepatitis B and CID viruses.

Source: World Health Organization

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    In 2016, an estimated 90 000 people died from measles – an 84% drop from more than 550 000 deaths in 2000 – according to a new report published today by leading health organizations. This marks the first time global measles deaths have fallen below 100 000 per year.

“Saving an average of 1.3 million lives per year through measles vaccine is an incredible achievement and makes a world free of measles seem possible, even probable, in our lifetime,” says Dr Robert Linkins, of the Measles and Rubella Initiative (MR&I) and Branch Chief of Accelerated Disease Control and Vaccine Preventable Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. M&RI is a partnership formed in 2001 of the American Red Cross, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the United Nations Foundation, UNICEF, and WHO.

Since 2000, an estimated 5.5 billion doses of measles-containing vaccines have been provided to children through routine immunization services and mass vaccination campaigns, saving an estimated 20.4 million lives.

“We have seen a substantial drop in measles deaths for more than two decades, but now we must strive to reach zero measles cases,” says Dr Jean-Marie Okwo-Bele, Director of WHO’s Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals. “Measles elimination will only be reached if measles vaccines reach every child, everywhere.”

The world is still far from reaching regional measles elimination goals. Coverage with the first of two required doses of measles vaccine has stalled at approximately 85% since 2009, far short of the 95% coverage needed to stop measles infections, and coverage with the second dose, despite recent increases, was only 64% in 2016.

Far too many children – 20.8 million – are still missing their first measles vaccine dose. More than half of these unvaccinated children live in six countries: Nigeria (3.3 million), India (2.9 million), Pakistan (2.0 million), Indonesia (1.2 million), Ethiopia (0.9 million), and Democratic Republic of the Congo (0.7 million). Since measles is a highly contagious viral disease, large outbreaks continue to occur in these and other countries in Europe and North America, putting children at risk of severe health complications such as pneumonia, diarrhoea, encephalitis, blindness, and death.

Agencies noted that progress in reaching measles elimination could be reversed when polio-funded resources supporting routine immunization services, measles and rubella vaccination campaigns, and surveillance, diminish and disappear following polio eradication. Countries with the greatest number of measles deaths rely most heavily on polio-funded resources and are at highest risk of reversing progress after polio eradication is achieved.

“This remarkable drop in measles deaths is the culmination of years of hard work by health workers, governments, and development agencies to vaccinate millions of children in the world’s poorest countries,” said Dr Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, one of the world’s largest supporters of measles immunization programmes. “However we cannot afford to be complacent. Too many children are still missing out on lifesaving vaccines. To reach these children and set ourselves on a realistic road to measles elimination we need to dramatically improve routine immunization backed by strong health systems.”

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By /Christian Megan  

WHO

GENEVA -

   The total number of suspected cholera cases in Yemen this year hit the half a million mark on Sunday, and nearly 2000 people have died since the outbreak began to spread rapidly at the end of April.

The overall caseload nationwide has declined since early July, particularly in the worst affected areas. But suspected cases of the deadly waterborne disease continue to rage across the country, infecting an estimated 5000 people per day.

The spread of cholera has slowed significantly in some areas compared to peak levels but the disease is still spreading fast in more recently affected districts, which are recording large numbers of cases.

Yemen's cholera epidemic, currently the largest in the world, has spread rapidly due to deteriorating hygiene and sanitation conditions and disruptions to the water supply across the country. Millions of people are cut off from clean water, and waste collection has ceased in major cities.

A collapsing health system is struggling to cope, with more than half of all health facilities closed due to damage, destruction or lack of funds. Shortages in medicines and supplies are persistent and widespread and 30 000 critical health workers have not been paid salaries in nearly a year.

"Yemen’s health workers are operating in impossible conditions. Thousands of people are sick, but there are not enough hospitals, not enough medicines, not enough clean water. These doctors and nurses are the backbone of the health response – without them we can do nothing in Yemen. They must be paid their wages so that they can continue to save lives," said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

WHO and partners are working around the clock to set up cholera treatment clinics, rehabilitate health facilities, deliver medical supplies, and support the national health response effort.

More than 99% of people sick with suspected cholera who can access health services are surviving. Furthermore, nearly 15 million people are unable to get basic healthcare.

"To save lives in Yemen today we must support the health system, especially the health workers. And we urge the Yemeni authorities – and all those in the region and elsewhere who can play a role – to find a political solution to this conflict that has already caused so much suffering. The people of Yemen cannot bear it much longer – they need peace to rebuild their lives and their country," said Dr. Tedros.

  It is worth to remind that Castle Journal  has been ahead for weeks when it broke all the borders and announced the true figure number of suspected patients with cholera which confirmed by the World Health Organization later.

And we mentioned that there are good reasons led to the high preparation of the injured and what is likely to a greater disaster if the international forces  did not intervene to save the Yemeni people from the risk of cholera.

  In this report Castle Journal has noticed that the collapse of the infrastructure and the lack of clean drinking water for human use and mixing with sewage water, as well as the destruction of all sewage networks and water stations because of the war there between the two sides of the Yemeni nation led to the aggravation of the situationCastle Journal mentioned that the most rugged areas of the mountains are difficult for the Yemeni medical team and the World Health Organization to reach them and also because of the fighting and conflict in those areas

 

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